Trauma

Trauma comes in many different forms, but can be broadly broken down into those suffering Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and those with Complex-PTSD (C-PTSD)

It can be associated with a relatively, discrete one=off event, such as being in a car crash or having been assaulted.

Clients with PTSD have generally been traumatised by a discrete one=off event, such as being in a car crash or having been assaulted. Their symptoms include:

  • intrusive thoughts – re-living the event
  • increased autonomic arousal – elevated heart rate, breathing issues
  • panic attacks
  • sleeplessness and appetite disturbance
  • feeling like no-one understands

Clients with C-PTSD have generally been traumatised over a prolonged period of time, often in childhood. They have suffered neglect, ongoing emotional insecurity and were often insecurely attached to a main caregiver. Their symptoms are often more relational in nature:

  • difficulties in making strong relational bonds (often seeking them out, but then avoiding deepening intimacy)
  • increased autonomic arousal – whilst their body is constantly on high alert, they are often unaware of this
  • generalized anxiety – they never feel safe
  • dissociated or fragmented sense of self
  • chronic mood disturbance

Whilst much technique I use overlaps in the two groups, workking with C-PTSD  understandably entails a more long-term therapeutic alliance.